Archive for March, 2016

VERLINDE hoist used for PELLOBY inverted travelling jib crane

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016

PELLOBY recently installed a unique inverted travelling jib crane featuring a VERLINDE VT2 EUROBLOC wire rope hoist at the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) ISIS complex at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory near Oxford.ISIS is a world-leading materials research centre which produces beams of neutrons and muons that can delve into the complexity of matter using a suite of beamline instruments, which gives unique insights into the properties of materials on the atomic scale.

A series of three adjacent overhead cranes span the width of one of the two large ISIS experimental halls onsite that allow access to the various beam defining equipment areas. However as the building´s capabilities were expanded to accommodate additional instruments, some of the new beam defining equipment areas were located in a ´cranage dead zone´ which the existing overhead cranes couldn´t reach.

Pelloby (www.pelloby.com) were asked to come up with a lifting solution to give ISIS and the various research teams at the complex, suitable craneage access to these dead zone areas – the aim being to lift beamline instrument components, shielding and other materials in and out of the restricted crane access areas.

Working closely with STFC engineers, our designers set to work and the result was an inverted travelling jib crane which can traverse the length of the building along a 53 metre gantry support rail system, while also providing continuous 360 degree access in a five metre radius thanks to a powered rotating jib arm. This innovative modified travelling jib crane can support loads of up to five tonnes thanks to a Verlinde VT2 Eurobloc hoist.

To read the full article, please click here

Hoist UK Welcome New Starter to Their Sales Team

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016

Hoist UK are proud to announce and welcome Colin Jones to their sales team as Technical Sales Engineer. Colin has been in the lifting industry for almost 25 years, having been previously employed by Chester Chain Co. where he started off on a temporary contract as a lifting equipment engineer, working his way through the ranks in various roles including site supervisor, & works manager, until he became General Manager in 2013. He brings with him a wealth of knowledge and experience of standard & specialised lifting equipment, along with his formal LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineers Association) qualifications.

CJ_Profile

“Having Colin join our team is a major asset for the company, as it is always difficult to employ a technical engineer with a proven track record in the industry” commented Hoist UK Director Paul Jordan. “Colin has a vast knowledge of the lifting equipment sector, and he will be a real advantage to us as the company grows, especially assisting with specialist projects that we are working on” he adds.

Colin Jones comments “I have known Paul & the team for many years and I was happy to be given the opportunity to work for such a dynamic and growing company. Their technical approach to project based work and their depth of product knowledge that allows them to attract such high profile projects excites me. I am really looking forward to the fresh challenge, and particularly working on projects like ISO rated clean room systems, ATEX applications and to be working more within the entertainment industry”.

Louise Dickson, General Manager of Hoist UK adds “We are pleased to welcome Colin to the Hoist UK family; he has got a great personality and will be a real asset both on site advising clients and in the office mentoring some of our other staff that are new to the industry”.

For further information visit: www.hoistuk.com or contact: info@hoistuk.com

Remember: Safety Above All

Hoist UK Help the Mars Rover

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Hoist UK are a manufacturer and supplier of lifting and handling equipment for the industrial and entertainment market sectors and have recently supplied a bespoke monorail hoisting solution latest generation of Mars Rover units at a facility based at Airbus UK in Stevenage in the United Kingdom.

Working directly for Bouygues Energies and Services, Hoist UK provided a hoist from their hygienic and clean room range which had some unique features for this very unique application,

Hoist UK Director Paul Jordan says: “The hoist was a 1.6 tonne SWL unit with 5.8 metres height of lift and all external surfaces of the hoist were polished stainless steel 316 with minimal horizontal surfaces to help maintain the cleanliness level of the room for the application and the unit was fitted with an infra-red remote control system”.

Paul Jordan adds: “The lifting medium in the hoist was a dyneema belt which is a non-metallic and natural fibre which does not require any additional lubrication, so is perfect for this type of application where cleanliness is a key feature of the required design. Normally electric chain hoists and electric wire rope hoists are used for this type of application but these types of hoists all need lubrication on the chain or wire rope, which is not desirable or permitted in order to keep the very strict cleanliness levels in some of these ISO rated clean rooms. Our hoisting solutions give the customers the very highest levels of cleanliness with equipment that is fit for purpose and manufactured to British and European standards”.

Clean Room Point Hoist

Hoist UK Director Tony Dickson comments: “Our customer and their end user were very happy with lifting system which was installed and commissioned over a two day installation period on Airbus UK site in Stevenage after successful testing in our works.”

Paul Jordan adds: “Hoist UK are not only able to provide standard equipment to suit our customer needs, but are also able to supply specialist and bespoke products manufactured here in the United Kingdom like for this application using our own in house design and manufacturing facilities.

Hoist UK is a full member of LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineers Association) with UKAS accreditation to ISO9001 (Quality), ISO14001 (Environment) and OSHA 18001 (Health & Safety) to give the customer peace of mind under their company motto of Safety Above All.”

LEEA are established across the globe as the respected and authoritative representative body for all those involved in the lifting industry worldwide.

For more information on our specialist range of lifting structures and appliances, please contact: sales@hoistuk.com

Remember: Safety Above All

Is your lifting equipment safe to use?

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

I am sure you will all know that if you own or operate lifting equipment in the UK you are required by law to ensure that you hold a current Report of Thorough Examination as set out in the Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER). Failure to hold a current report could invalidate your insurances or leave you open to prosecution.

So, is having a current LOLER Report of Thorough Examination sufficient to comply with all of your legal responsibilities as an employer or owner of the equipment? The simple answer is no.

The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 covers all work places and defines the obligations of all employers AND employees to ensure a safe working environment, with the employer obliged under their duty of care to asses risks and put into place policies and procedures to control said risks.

Further, under the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER), an employer must ensure all equipment is safely installed and safe to use and that regular inspections of the equipment is undertaken and documented by a competent person. The regular inspections may take the form of pre use check lists, interim inspections, preventative maintenance programmes etc all leading up to a LOLER examination.

A Report of Thorough Examination under LOLER can be likened to having your car undergo an annual MOT, at the time of the Thorough Examination or your cars MOT the examiner will look at all the safety related components but will not undertake any repair work or take into account any previous or future inspection / maintenance regime or lack of it. Like the MOT for your car a Thorough Examination is not part of or to be considered a substitute for the maintenance process, it should be carried out and reported on separately.

So, a Report of Thorough Examination does not quite cover all of the bases with regards to the current legislation and an employer’s duty of care.

LOLER

Who can carry out a thorough examination?

The LOLER ’98 and PUWER ’98 Regulations simply require that a thorough examination is carried out by “a competent person”, the HSE definition of a competent person is;

“The term ‘competent person’ is not defined in law but the LOLER Approved Code of Practice and guidance (paragraph 294 on competent persons) states that:

  ‘You should ensure that the person carrying out a thorough examination has such appropriate practical and theoretical knowledge and experience of the lifting equipment to be thoroughly examined as will enable them to detect defects or weaknesses and to assess their importance in relation to the safety and continued use of the lifting equipment.’

 Although the competent person may often be employed by another organisation, this is not necessary, provided they are sufficiently independent and impartial to ensure that in-house examinations are made without fear or favour.

However having an external person or company complete the report of Thorough Examination does remove any doubt of having in house maintenance personnel verifying their own work.

As a practical guide the following are likely to be able to complete a Thorough Examination of your lifting equipment under LOLER ’98 and PUWER ’98 regulations;

 

  • An experienced lifting equipment engineer, preferably a *LEEA TEAM card holder.must be applicable to the examination being completed.
  • *The TEAM card will list the qualifications of the member, and these qualifications
  • The manufacturer of your lifting equipment or their certified representative.
  • A specialist inspector working for an insurance company.It is worth noting that an “insurance inspection” is not necessarily a “Thorough Examination” and before you rely on such an inspection you should make sure that the documentation you receive from an insurance company is headed “Report of Thorough Examination” and is in accordance with schedule 1 of LOLER.

 

What should be noted on a Report of Thorough Examination?

 A Thorough Examination under LOLER is a detailed examination of the safety critical parts of the equipment carried out by a competent person and will require the examiner to physically check these parts noting any defects, this will require the equipment to be removed from use during the inspection and may require covers and guards to be removed to allow thorough inspection. The report should detail the following per schedule 1 of LOLER;

 

  1. The name and address of the employer for whom the thorough examination was made.
  2. The address of the premises at which the thorough examination was made.
  3. Particulars sufficient to identify the lifting equipment including where known its date of manufacture.
  4. The date of the last thorough examination.
  5. The safe working load of the lifting equipment or (where its safe working load depends on the configuration of the lifting equipment) its safe working load for the last configuration in which it was thoroughly examined.
  6. In relation to the first thorough examination of lifting equipment after installation or after assembly at a new site or in a new location—

 

  1. that it is such thorough examination;
  2. (if such be the case) that it has been installed correctly and would be safe to operate.
  1. In relation to a thorough examination of lifting equipment other than a thorough examination to which paragraph 6 relates—

 

  1. whether it is a thorough examination—

(i) within an interval of 6 months under regulation 9(3)(a)(i);

(ii) within an interval of 12 months under regulation 9(3)(a)(ii);

(iii) in accordance with an examination scheme under regulation 9(3)(a)(iii); or

(iv) after the occurrence of exceptional circumstances under regulation 9(3)(a)(iv);

  1. (if such be the case) that the lifting equipment would be safe to operate.
  1. In relation to every thorough examination of lifting equipment—

 

  1. identification of any part found to have a defect which is or could become a danger to persons, and a description of the defect;
  2. particulars of any repair, renewal or alteration required to remedy a defect found to be a danger to persons;
  3. in the case of a defect which is not yet but could become a danger to persons—

(i) the time by which it could become such danger;

(ii) particulars of any repair, renewal or alteration required to remedy it;

  1. the latest date by which the next thorough examination must be carried out;
  2. where the thorough examination included testing, particulars of any test;
  3. the date of the thorough examination.

 

  1. The name, address and qualifications of the person making the report; that he is self-employed or, if employed, the name and address of his employer.
  2. The name and address of a person signing or authenticating the report on behalf of its author.
  3. The date of the report.

LOLER 2

When should I have a Report of Thorough Examination?

The requirement for Thorough Examination is to ensure that lifting equipment and accessories are and remain safe for use, and that we can detect and rectify any deterioration before it becomes a safety issue and as such are required throughout the lifetime of the equipment.

Before use for the first time – unless equipment has an EC declaration of conformity that is less than 12 months old.

  • After assembly and before use at every location – particularly relevant to lifting equipment hire companies.
  • Following exceptional circumstances likely to jeopardise the equipment’s safety – damage or failure, return into use after a long period, or major changes or modification.
  • Regularly whilst in service – see below.

Unless the equipment is covered under a specific “examination scheme” or increased inspections have been highlighted under a project specific Risk Assessment then Thorough Examinations should be conducted:

 

  • 6 months, for lifting equipment and any associated accessories used to lift people
  • 6 months, for all lifting accessories
  • 12 months, for all other lifting equipment

 

Under PUWER and regulation 9 (4) of LOLER, lifting equipment may also require regular maintenance and inspections to determine any deterioration that may affect the safety of the equipment. The requirement and frequency of these inspections checks or maintenance should be determined by risk assessment and manufacturers information or determined by the competent person.

 

The Thorough Examination acts as a regular safety check, and if there any defects stated in the report, it points to there being issues with your regular inspection and maintenance scheme. If the report indicates that the item is no longer fit for purpose it is likely to indicate poor installation, poorly trained operators, poorly trained maintenance personnel or an inadequate maintenance regime.

 

Is your lifting equipment really safe to use?

Generally speaking the employer of the operator / user of the lifting equipment is responsible for ensuring that lifting equipment is safe, fit for purpose and has regular inspections and thorough examinations carried out and documented.

For your own peace of mind you should make sure that you have and document regular pre use and interim operator checks, regular inspections and have a preventative maintenance plan in place to ensure that your equipment is safe to use under LOLER and PUWER.

Make sure that any insurance inspection you have on your equipment is actually a “Thorough Examination” and is accompanied with the correct documentation as required by law under LOLER and PUWER.

Make sure that you have fulfilled all of your other duties, as well as having the Thorough Examination you need to have your equipment regularly maintained, so why not use a reputable lifting equipment company to cover all aspects of your duties.

Read the Report of Thorough Examination! Do not just file this away and assume all your responsibilities are covered by having this done. You must also read the report and action any comments or recommendations given by the competent person.

The examining company will issue a report, the report will outline the equipment that has passed inspection but will also outline defects, problems and condemned equipment, it is your responsibility to act upon the report, replacing or repairing defective equipment and making sure that dangerous equipment is not put back into circulation – the examining company should have tagged and quarantined these items for you.

Like the MOT on your car you are responsible for having any defects put right AND having the equipment re-inspected following repair or to buy replacement equipment if repairs are uneconomical. A good inspection company will follow up the report with a quotation to replace or repair, or even be able to complete the repairs on site after receiving authorisation from yourself; an insurance company probably will not offer a repair or replacement service and may not even follow up on their report.

You should choose to have your Thorough Examinations and maintenance carried out by a company that are members of LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineers Association), LEEA members are trained to understand the full scope of the regulations and possible shortfalls of duty holder’s knowledge of their requirements, and in most cases go beyond the minimum requirements that insurance companies tend to stick to.

Hoist UK are FULL members of LEEA, you can also find a list of all LEEA members on their website www.leeaint.com .

VERLINDE hoist used for PELLOBY inverted travelling jib crane

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

PELLOBY recently installed a unique inverted travelling jib crane featuring a VERLINDE VT2 EUROBLOC wire rope hoist at the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) ISIS complex at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory near Oxford. ISIS is a world-leading materials research centre which produces beams of neutrons and muons that can delve into the complexity of matter using a suite of beamline instruments, which gives unique insights into the properties of materials on the atomic scale.

A series of three adjacent overhead cranes span the width of one of the two large ISIS experimental halls onsite that allow access to the various beam defining equipment areas. However as the building´s capabilities were expanded to accommodate additional instruments, some of the new beam defining equipment areas were located in a ´cranage dead zone´ which the existing overhead cranes couldn´t reach.

Pelloby (www.pelloby.com) were asked to come up with a lifting solution to give ISIS and the various research teams at the complex, suitable craneage access to these dead zone areas – the aim being to lift beamline instrument components, shielding and other materials in and out of the restricted crane access areas.

Working closely with STFC engineers, our designers set to work and the result was an inverted travelling jib crane which can traverse the length of the building along a 53 metre gantry support rail system, while also providing continuous 360 degree access in a five metre radius thanks to a powered rotating jib arm. This innovative modified travelling jib crane can support loads of up to five tonnes thanks to a Verlinde VT2 Eurobloc hoist.

To read the full article, please click here.

Launch of New Bluetooth-compatible Load cell PRR

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016

Announcing a new PRR (Portable Radio Receiver), a compact and highly portable Bluetooth-compatible load monitoring system capable of monitoring up to 40 individual load cells from the convenience of an iPad or iPhone using the Ron StageMaster App.

Features Bluetooth compatibility with iPhones / iPads (no WiFi required)

Features:

  • Bluetooth connection – no need for WiFi or additional equipment
  • Excellent range – up to 150m/450ft from the loading point
  • Multiple display and visualization options – monitor loads as real-time load map, bar graphs or as a fully-detailed list
  • Pocket-sized radio receiver – great portability and convenience for riggers and supervisors
  • Simple operation – add/remove load cells, TARE, ZERO and set overload/underload alarms from a single screen.

schema bluetooth (4) (2)

Ideal for all types of load monitoring when out in the field, this PRR enables convenient portability with independence from WiFi. The functions as an independent portable system, or as an excellent portable add-on to an existing system and is a great introductory-level load monitoring system for first-time users who wish to start working in a safe mode. Because users can use their own portable devices, it serves as a more cost effective monitoring solution.

System advantages:

  • Bluetooth compatibility with iPhones / iPads (no Wi-Fi required)
  • 0.1% accuracy with Eilon Classic load cells
  • 24/7/365 continuous load monitoring
  • Unbeatable standard battery life up to 5,000 hours
  • Extreme range up to several km/miles
  • 200 load cells per monitoring station
  • Proven wireless technology since 1976
  • Integration of wireless and wired systems
  • Fatigue-rated load cells